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JEAN SHEPHERD–My books about him + SHEP’S KID STORY BOOK

JULY 26, 2016, JEAN SHEPHERD WOULD HAVE BEEN 95, AND SEVERAL WEEKS AGO I TURNED 78. I THINK WE’VE BOTH WAITED LONG ENOUGH.

My two failure-to-find-publishers for completed book manuscripts about Shepherd I’ve cannibalized and posted on this blog: Keep Your Knees Loose: More A. & E. of Jean Shepherd and Jean Shepherd Legends, Conundrums, & Gallimaufries. They detail my quests for new information about Shepherd, and include descriptions of communications I’ve received from his third wife, actress Lois Nettleton, letters written by his producer/fourth wife Leigh Brown, an interview with the delightful woman I call “The Vampire Lady,” an extensive interview with Shepherd enthusiast, lead singer/song writer of rock band Twisted Sister, Dee Snider, and an interview with the editor/publisher of one of Shepherd’s books and of Leigh Brown’s book, THE SHOW GYPSIES. I comment extensively on the similarities and contrasts between Shepherd and his best friend, Shel Silverstein. I discuss the relationship between Shepherd and Hugh Hefner, and with the Beatles. I describe how Shepherd’s creation for Sesame Street, the animated cartoon “Cowboy X” (which can be seen on YouTube), and his story about getting a fishing fly hook stuck in his ear, are both important metaphors for his entire career. The third unpublished book manuscript incorporates  dozens of Shep’s travel tales, also completely posted on this site.

My picaresque travels through the land of Shep have led to many adventures and to many new and fascinating discoveries–and I continue sallying forth in all directions in search of more grails.

  •   •   •   •   •   •

For the last two years (yes, 2 years) I’ve been told by a publisher that my manuscript of Shepherd’s kid stories as told on the air and none of which have been published in print, seemed close to getting a contract. Another publisher reported interest in it, but was heading for a couple weeks’ vacation around Christmas and he’d get back to me soon thereafter–it’s now July and no word. In mid-March the first publisher said the book was just awaiting a contract signature from one of the biggest/best-known New York publishers! Several months later (mid-May) I asked in an email what was happening about that imminent signature–I got no reply. It’s now several months after my tickler email about that signature and still no word.

For half a century, through fiction and non-fiction, I’ve worked hard at writing, attempted publishing, awaiting publishers’ responses to me (usually at least a 3-month delay in publisher-responses for each submission–and they discourage multiple submissions), and agonized my way through the contracted-for two Shep books from signed contract to publication day (Excelsior, You Fathead! and Shep’s Army). “Agonized”? Besides the understandable hard work, let’s just leave the rest at: lost battles, insult, and injury.

I tried 10 agents, asking them to represent my Shep books, and got no positive replies.

Now I’m tired of hanging by my thumbs.

So I’m going to start posting my transcripts of Shepherd’s broadcast kid stories on this blog. At any stage, should a publisher hand me a signed contract, I’ll sign it, stop posting the kid book (if I’m forced to), and we can get going on putting those kid stories in print-on-paper, the way  I–and probably Shep–would have preferred to see them.

Followers of this blog have seen the very positive forewords for the book manuscript from Twain, Fields, and Kafka. (Thanks, guys!) I’m about to start posting my introduction to this book that’s tentatively  titled:

I WAS THIS KID, SEE–

JEAN SHEPHERD KID STORIES

or

JEAN SHEPHERD KID STORIES–

I WAS THIS KID, SEE

or

SHEP’S KID STORIES

or something sorta like that.

Happy birthday, Jean Parker Shepherd.

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JEAN SHEPHERD–AM and FM, Plus (32) ARTSY Planetarium

AM radio uses amplitude modulation,…Transmissions are affected by static and interference because lightning and other sources of radio emissions on the same frequency add their amplitudes to the original transmitted amplitude.

….Currently, the maximum broadcast power for a civilian AM radio station in the United States and Canada is 50 kW….These 50 kW stations are generally called clear channel stations because within North America each of these stations has exclusive use of its broadcast frequency throughout part or all of the broadcast day.

FM broadcast radio sends music and voice with less noise than AM radio. It is often mistakenly thought that FM is higher fidelity than AM, but that is not true…. Because the audio signal modulates the frequency and not the amplitude, an FM signal is not subject to static and interference in the same way as AM signals.

The foregoing originates from wikipedia.org. Take that as you will.

FM image

Most descriptions of Jean Shepherd’s radio work describes his major New York City station as “WOR AM.” This jangles the daylights out of me every time I come across it. Because from his earliest NY broadcasts he was on WOR AM & FM. In fact, from September 1956 and into 1965, I mainly (if not entirely) listened to him on WOR FM. My parents had bought an early AM/FM radio so that my mother could listen to the once-a-week social studies class in which I was one of four or five students, broadcasting from the WNYE FM studios atop Brooklyn Technical High School I attended.

BTHS antenna

BTHS showing radio broadcast antenna.

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This Zenith is like my old maroon AM/FM radio with the big gold dial.

Most people who now comment on their live-listening-days, listened on little AM transistor radios (as kids, the radios hidden under their pillows). Another reason so many leave out FM, I’d guess, is that once people encounter the inaccurate exclusion of FM in a reference, they repeat it without realizing that it isn’t quite correct. This way of thinking (accepting as true while failing to check original sources) causes many errors in descriptions of many aspects of Shepherd’s work.

Shepherd was not happy when the Federal Communications Commission decreed that the world would be a better place if stations with both AM and FM outputs broadcast different programming on each rather than the same programs:

Oh—this is WOR AM and FM in New York. This is the last time we’ll be on FM, right? Ohhh, it’s a poor, sad note. This is the last night we’ll be on FM. [said with irony.] Of course radio’s moving forward. Now I understand we have some magnificent programming for you—on FM. I’m sure of that—[Laughs.]

[Sings.] I’m forever blowing bubbles. [Laughs.] Ah well. Ah well. Progress is a slow descent into quicksand.–transcriptions snatched from my EYF!

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It’s my understanding that the quicksand of later-day WOR included programs featuring Rush Limbaugh, Sean Hannity, and rock-and-roll. Yes, Ol’ Shep would have been delighted (“#@^%*#”).

Listen to the station identifications on Shep’s broadcasts

prior to mid-1966 for the old, familiar announcement.

On some of the Limelight broadcasts Shep

has the live audience yell:

“This is WOR AM and FM, New York!”

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(31) PLANETARIUM

On the stairway in the old Hayden Planetarium, part of the American Museum of Natural History where I worked for 34 years, there was a sign that said, TO SOLAR SYSTEM AND RESTROOM. I wonder who has that sign now, because the old planetarium, an official New York City landmark, is no more. For decades I looked through the window by my desk, across the museum’s public parking lot, to the green-domed planetarium, until the day it was scheduled to be demolished and they put up a shroud around it.

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Many wondered why the old landmark building had to be destroyed instead of redesigned inside. Many mourned the old building while invisible crews behind the white sheets killed it and carted it away.(I scavenged two bricks, which I still have.) One of us mourners, who happened to be writing poems in those days, wrote an elegy and designed it into a book.

planet poem front

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Just the first and last 2-page spreads in the book.

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How many millions would be spent and how many millions to maintain the new technology to be installed in the new, modern, glass cube? Indeed, that the newcomer was stunning, was somewhat undercut in some employees’ minds when someone circulated a magazine ad that showed an unheralded office building somewhere, that had been previously architected in that same sphere-in-glass-cube-format. Well, still, the newcomer on Manhattan’s Upper West Side was and is spectacular.

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STAR TREK

Somehow, I dwell on the past, maybe because, before that old Planetarium’s demise, I got to design into it our museum’s installation of a temporary exhibit of original Star Trek costumes and other memorabilia loaned to the Smithsonian. That original had been installed in traditional rectangular cases set blandly one after another with no sense of ambiance. I had other ideas in mind, as shown by the entrance and by the central exhibit case full of costumes in a setting evocative of the Enterprise’s bridge.

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We had very little time to build and install. I ordered the Star Trek type font and designed a blank form so my memos would grab priority-attention of the Construction Department. I also used it for a personal memento with our kids. (Junior Officers’ uniforms designed and made by Allison M. Bergmann.)

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Stirring my memories of the Planetarium-past,

while designing and installing this exhibit eons ago and light years away,

yet garnering what must be the envy of trekkies across the universe,

I got to mock-fire a painted, wooden phaser set to stun,

hold in my hand Mr. Spock’s wax ear,

sit in Captain Kirk’s chair,

and touch a tribble.

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JEAN SHEPHERD–Gatherings of a Bibliophile Part 4 of 4 & (29) ARTSY Music Wall

Printings, Pricing, Inscriptions.

For someone who is widely unknown among the vast, deprived American public, Jean Shepherd’s books, nearly a half-century after he wrote them, continue to sell, which I can verify because I keep tabs on the current printings of his two best-selling books in paperback.  In God We Trust, All Others Pay Cash, as of this writing, has gone through over three dozen printings, and Wanda Hickey’s Night of Golden Memories, And Other Disasters has passed its twenty-fourth printing.

Think Small, the small give-away promotional book published by Volkswagen in the heady days of the original Beetle, contains cartoons and short humorous essays by Charles Addams, Harry Golden, Roger Price, H. Allen Smith, Jean Shepherd, and others.  The longest piece in the book, by Shepherd, concerning his teenage experience buying his first used car, unlike the rest of the contributions, has nothing to do with the VW.  Think Small, thirty years after original publication, now sells for prices varying from about four dollars to well over a hundred, depending on the ignorance or whim of many internet book dealers.  Some years ago I paid ten dollars when that was the lowest-going price.

The bibliographic details of my special subject are not endless, but I, like an object-specific magnet, seem to attract some of the rare and peculiar elements of Shepherd’s writing life.  When, sight unseen through the internet, I bought a used first of his Wanda Hickey, it was my surprise and great good fortune to receive in the mail, a Dover, New Jersey ex-library copy with, as an insider’s little joke done decades before, a presentation sticker affixed to the inside front cover proclaiming that its donors were the Dover High School orchestra’s tuba section (as most Shepherd fans know, in some of his radio commentaries, he described his high school experiences playing the tuba).  My surprised acquisition of this little treasure is a fortuitous occurrence that some others would have sufficiently appreciated.

Finally, a few words about a specially inscribed copy of Shepherd’s In God We Trust that I had in my covetous hands, but could not possess.   After actress Lois Nettleton, Shepherd’s third wife, died in 2008, her executor showed me her copy of Shepherd’s “novel.”   She had been an important part of his early radio career and, after his death in 1999 she corresponded with me about him.  I may well be the world’s only kook with a special interest in the association of Shepherd and Nettleton, but the executor would not let me buy it for the pittance I could afford, as he expected to sell it for a bundle.  To my knowledge, neither Shepherd nor Nettleton fans ever pay even two hundred dollars for material associated with them, and the relationship of the two must not be of much interest to any of them.   I very much doubted that the book dealer subsequently offering it for sale would find a buyer willing to part with even a fraction of his two-thousand dollar asking price.  I lust after that book, but from my little allowance I could have just about afforded a tenth of the two grand. Recently I found that a Shepherd enthusiast with much deeper pockets than mine, had come up with the many hundreds necessary (how many hundreds?) and now has that copy.

The potential value of the book (dollar value to a dealer, and intellectual value to me) lies in its inscription.  Inscribed at about the time that they parted, Shepherd wrote on the half title page:

“To my own Lois, without whom this book would have been finished two years sooner—!  Love—Jean Shepherd (Mr. Nettleton).”

By sheer coincidence, I recently encountered a reference to a book written many years earlier, with its acknowledgement attributed to Franklin P. Adams, one of Shepherd’s favorite writers:  ”To my loving wife, but for whose constant interruptions, this book would have been finished six months earlier.” So, with a little work, I encountered from another of Shepherd’s favorites, P. G. Wodehouse, his dedication of his book The Heart of a Goof, published in 1926: “To my daughter Leonora Without whose never-failing sympathy and encouragement this book would have been finished in half the time.” A case of unattributed borrowing?   But that is a minor matter to a Shep-kook.

IGWT shep to lois

One might wonder what circumstances led to Shepherd’s inscription to his wife—especially in this copy of his book that was a later printing of the first edition (Horrors!).  But what were the never-to-be-understood circumstances behind such an apparent attack by Shepherd?  I can understand how one might think such thoughts, but I don’t see how a relationship could survive the open expression of such a comment—in ink on paper—in his treasured “novel”!  I don’t usually seek sordid details regarding my subject, but gathering bits of evidence, which I have been able to accumulate through single-minded quests for Art and Art alone, I wonder if, soon after Lois had thrown him out of their apartment and changed the locks, he hoped somehow to evoke sympathy leading to a reprieve through this inappropriately tangled wit.  Did he thus send her this poisoned copy?  (A reliable source told me that Shepherd dearly wanted to return to her.)   This all gains some credence as these circumstances happened during the same period during which, from time to time on his radio show, he had mock-seriously, mock-humorously, sung, “After you’ve gone, and left me crying….”   Overly intimate matters I’d gathered as I’m not-Shepherd’s-biographer.  How in heaven’s name did I ever get caught up in detective work and a soap opera scenario?

I’ll probably never understand some of the enigmatic details of Shepherd’s life.  Although interest in personal gossip is mostly a very natural human one, as for me, I’ve never cared about writing a tell-all biography or any other kind.  I must remind myself that I am neither his bibliographer nor his biographer.  In writing about him I try my imperfect but virtuous best to focus on the work, with essential biography only as it relates to that work.  Thus, when I search even under metaphorical beds, salacious tidbits are sometimes inevitable encounters within my major responsibility: dealing with dusty boxes of stuff and foggy memories regarding his significant art, Art, ART!

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MUSIC WALL

“The wall is alive with the shapes of music….

The wall fills my heart with the shapes of music.

My heart wants to sing every shape it feels.”

[Lyrics altered from The Sound of Music.]

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Despite having a tin ear and no sense of rhythm,

I’m intrigued by the shapes that create the sounds of musical instruments.

I am a “luthier,” a classical guitar-maker. That is, I took a course and made the instrument on the left.

Mom’s violin—while playing she moaned, so as a child I always thought she was in agony. I think that may have been part of my negative feelings about her teaching me to play. I was good and played in grammar school and high school orchestras. Later in high school, violin practice-time was abandoned in favor of tough homework. As an adult I realized that my mother moaned in an agony of ecstasy.

My wife, Allison, gave me the zither, which, for its shape and bulk, forms a kind of solidly emphatic crown atop our display of instruments on our living room wall.

Prima ballerina Suzanne Farrell’s autographed dance slippers evoke, for me, her dancing elegance.

The small guitar-shaped “charango” I bought from a luthier in Cuzco, Peru. This rhythm instrument is almost always part of Peruvian folk music groups. It comes in three forms: a guitar-shaped construction; a bottom that is smoothly sculpted wood in the shape of an armadillo’s back; and the more authentic kind I have, the bottom of which is made of an actual armadillo’s head and back–plates, hair, ears, and all.

My father’s banjo-uke reminds me of the only two songs he sang and accompanied himself on during my childhood: “It Ain’t Gonna Rain No Mo, No Mo,” and “If I Had the Wings of an Angel.” My father was a steadfast and loving husband and father. I always liked it when he picked up his uke to play.

I like the sounds of flutes in many shapes and sizes. Side-blown and end-blown. Wood, metal, bamboo, ceramic, bone.

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JEAN SHEPHERD–Gatherings of a Bibliophile Part 2 of 4 &(25) ARTSY Japanese Art 3 Ways

Shepherd loved not only books, but their multitudinous components, words.   Sometimes on his radio shows he would ask someone in the studio or a listener in “radioland,” to look up a word in a dictionary, just to be sure that he and his listeners understood it properly.   During one show he announced with great pride that one of his invented phrases, “creeping meatballism,” a comment on conformism, had been formally attributed to him in a new dictionary of slang.  He also enjoyed the references to himself in several New York Times crossword puzzles, and one can imagine his joy when, in 1972,  he found that the Times puzzle of the day referred to him and his works in eleven words and phrases.  A few years back, hearing a rebroadcast of this announcement, I rushed to the microfilm section of my local library to look it up and print it out, thus participating with Shepherd in his bibliophilia and the thrill of his honor, encountering such treasures in the puzzle as, VERBAL SHEPHERD, AIR SPIELER, and his favorite word, EXCELSIOR.

crossword for blog

Although I recognize that many bibliophiles must also have unusual stories to tell regarding their own favorites, as a “Shep-kook,” it seems to me that the strangeness of my ragtag little batch of Shepherd books, references, and ephemera is without parallel and is worth describing.

What Author? What Book?

A publishing episode that must have driven Shepherd, the ever-striving author, crazy, involves a coffee-table book about one of his favorite subjects: The Scrapbook History of Baseball.  Except for the acknowledgements page and a foreword, the book consists entirely of un-annotated, photo-reproductions of newspaper articles from the years 1876 to 1974.  The book contains no authored text other than the duly attributed two-page foreword by Shepherd.  Four baseball experts, whose sole job was to select the articles for reproduction, are listed as “authors.”   But at best, those four compilers might more accurately have been titled “researchers.”  Creator of that sole text, Shepherd might, in these strange circumstances, have been dignified with the title of  “author.” Or have I missed something in the book-world’s definition of “author”?

One encounters Shepherd’s short stories everywhere.  There is the hardbound, small publication, A Christmas Story, described on the cover as “The book that inspired the hilarious classic film.”  But this book, first published in 2003, did not inspire the 1983 film.  The book consists of five of Shepherd’s kid stories first published in the 1960s that were seamlessly synthesized into the film.  Twenty years after that film was released, without even an attempt at cobbling them together into a logical storyline, those stories were gathered conveniently into a book.  Though no crime, the malfeasance lies in claiming, two decades after the fact, that the book as a “book,” rather than that the selected stories in it inspired the film.  This false promotion is a distortion inspired by sales-potential.  As we know, a simple lie is more easily believed than a more complicated truth.  Every so often I encounter much more important re-printings of individual Shepherd stories.  He must have enjoyed seeing these stories in schoolbooks as subjects for studying English composition and style.  And what pride to find, in another small volume, The Little Book of Fishing, one of his stories rubbing shoulders with those by the likes of Hemingway, Seamus Heaney, and Red Smith.

END OF PART 2

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(25) JAPANESE ART—3 WAYS

I own Japanese art in various formats, mostly in reproduction, some original. On our bedroom wall, a trio of images represents three different ways of being. The two top ones are of 19th century woodblock prints, the traditional technique in which the artist draws on rice paper with brush and ink, artisans adhere this to a flat block and someone cuts away whatever is not the black lines. The line-block is then printed in black and the artist indicates on these sheets what and where each color should be. These sheets are adhered to blocks. Then a woodcutter cuts away on each block, whatever is not to be that color. Then all blocks are printed on each sheet to render the final originals of the work.

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The left top print on our wall, by Hokusai (most famous work is the “Great Wave”), is not from the original blocks. It is a second edition, made by gluing first editions down on blocks and re-cutting every line—including every leaf of grass–then reprinting. (I compared my print with a reproduction of a verified first edition to encounter an occasional leaf of grass not properly rendered.) This image is from Hokusai’s “Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji.” Which consists of 42 views. It’s one of my favorites. I love the dynamism shown by the strong wind affecting humans, papers, hat, trees and leaves, and leaves of grass. I appreciate the dynamic swirl of the footpath, the little objects being swept off to the right, and the immense thin outline of Fuji.

The top right print is a high-quality reproduction of my favorite print by Hiroshige. His work tends to be more flat and stylized than Hokusai’s, which is more “realistic.” Here, in a simple and powerful composition, we see the strong wind and rain, bearing down on humans and the background trees.

As an enthusiast of traditional Japanese art, I spent some time observing, in process, the Japanese section of the American Museum of Natural History’s permanent Asian Peoples Hall. One of the museum’s background painters, Matthew Kalmenoff, worked on the small diorama of a country scene with traditional rice fields. As a coworker and friend of his, I asked to see his preliminary sketch for the curved diorama wall. I expressed delight in it. In his appreciation for the support I’d given him and his work over the years, he signed it and gave it to me. It is a treasure. I enjoy contemplating it and noting some of the painting’s compositional design features.

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Two of the berms separating parts of the fields are not parallel with the rest, but come together at an angle at the bottom of the painting so that they enclose it, rather than presenting a visual barrier parallel at the bottom edge.

One of the clouds is perfectly positioned to be reflected in the water, highlighting the farmers.

Regarding the row of farmers planting, the closest one’s round hat is not quite facing the viewer—it’s close enough to a circle to grab attention, but not so much so as to form a bull’s eye that would be hard for the eye to escape. The other hats are even less shown as circles, allowing the eye to move diagonally up the row of them further into the picture. The distant figure with animal is in line to assist the eye to make the little leap even further toward the background.

The design then moves the eye in a zigzag pattern to the right, then, with the help of the land and water there, back to the furthest reaches on the left.

The small building in the middle right is just big enough to give some focus of attention and to prevent the entire right side from being too bare—it almost forms a small framing device, its large tree perfectly placed to block the water there from moving the eye too far rightward–indeed, it caroms the moving eye back to the left.

I see this painting every morning as I get out of bed. I delight in contemplating how Kal’s composition, in what was done as an unimportant, preliminary sketch, but which is so well thought-out, was so elegantly created.

I’ve encountered a photo of the completed diorama, with artifacts in the foreground. I see that, responding to the three-dimensional material, Kal changed a few of the background painting’s details. Magnificent! Rest in peace, Matthew Kalmenoff.

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Diorama in the Museum’s Hall of Asian Peoples

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JEAN SHEPHERD–Gatherings of a Bibliophile Part 1 of 3

On a subject that I believe would be of interest to book-lovers in general in addition to Shepherd fans, I wrote the following article (with illustrations) and submitted it to a high-class magazine devoted to book-collecting. The editor’s response was that he liked it but wanted it to be rather more filled-out with what I felt was uninteresting, difficult-to-ferret-out, pedantic material I had no interest in putting in the required, self-induced and boring grunge work, to accomplish. I much prefer ideas to minutia. Here, with very minor adjustments, is what I believe will be of interest. There are a few details some may remember previously encountering in my work or that by others. But I feel that gathering all of this together, it forms a whole more valuable than the sum of its scattered parts.

STRANGE BUT TRUE ADVENTURES IN THE WORLD

OF A SHEPHERD BIBLIPHILE

I love books and I collect them and a few associated ephemera.  Although I have thousands of books, my special gatherings run to a couple of what I call “poor man’s” collections—over the years I’ve bought what my limited budget permitted.  I have almost all of Hemingway in first editions, but not all in pristine condition, and a couple of his earliest ones only in facsimile.  The facsimiles themselves have risen in rarity and price, gaining admittance among the “collectables.”  Although none are signed, when I had more than a bit of loose change, for use as a bookmark for reading his books, I purchased a wine card from a transatlantic liner, which he signed for the booze that he bought one afternoon.  I have all of Norman Mailer first editions, many of them signed, most of them in pristine condition.  Yet my special treasure is the first edition of his The Naked and the Dead with its rather worn and torn dust jacket, which he signed for me in person.  I gather that this jacket is made of rather fragile stuff, so a poor man’s collection is not likely to have a pristine example.  His signed letter to me regarding one of my unpublished manuscripts is framed on a wall over my desk.  I have most of E. E. Cummings in firsts, but none signed.  I make do with a signed postcard written by Cummings to New York’s 8th Street Bookshop.  Like the Hemingway wine card, I also use it as a bookmark.  So I possess, on a couple of crowded shelves, some ephemeral associations to some of the literature I love.

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Cummings wrote poems in lower case,

but signed with initial caps.

In recent years my focus has altered to an area that is more unusual in its bibliographic focus.  The subject is the American humorist, active in the second half of the twentieth century, Jean Shepherd.  The area is much less well-known, though I find it fascinating, maybe in large part because I wrote the only book about him.  In addition to many overflowing file boxes of background information, notes, and audio tapes and CDs of his radio broadcasts, I’ve accumulated the small group of first editions of all the books by this great American creative force, who was a humorist, author, film-maker, and creator of several television series.  A major talk-radio innovator, broadcaster of thousands of shows over the decades, and creator of the holiday favorite movie, A Christmas Story, Shepherd talked about everything one can think of, for years improvising 45-minutes a night.  Originally he had not wanted to write down his improvised stories because, I believe, as a raconteur he felt that the spoken word was the prime medium not only of humankind in general, but of himself in particular.  Besides, he invented his spoken stories without a script and probably liked the idea of keeping them that way.

However, his wife at the time, actress Lois Nettleton, said that she and others urged him to write down some of his stories, and Shel Silverstein, his best friend, cartoonist, and children’s book author, with connections to Playboy, helped convince him to write them down and submit them to the magazine.  From the mid-1960s through 1981, Playboy printed nearly two dozen of them, most of them fictions about his Indiana childhood, a couple of them fictions about his life in the Signal Corps during World War II.  Many of these stories, and many of his articles on varied subjects published in varied magazines, were gathered into books such as In God We Trust—All Others Pay Cash.  (He had a proclivity for making up odd titles for most of his stories and books.)  The stories upon which the movie A Christmas Story is based came from these books.

Sometimes Shepherd discussed his love of books during his radio broadcasts.  He was obsessed with reading—on one program he commented that if he couldn’t find other material to occupy him, he’d read the copy on Wheaties boxes, and, he said that if even more desperate, he would remove his shoe and read the words impressed in rubber on the bottom of his heel.  He said that as an adolescent, he was first inspired to read after having borrowed from the library Thomas Wolf’s Look Homeward, Angel, finding it not totally understandable, yet supremely inspiring.  It led to his lifelong love of reading and writing, and, undoubtedly, influenced his decision to publish his spoken stories in print.  Apparently for the prestige value, he referred to his first book of gathered, strung-together stories, as a “novel.”

END OF PART 1

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JEAN SHEPHERD–BOBBLEHEAD unveiled! Part 2 of 2

Jean Shepherd Bobblehead!

Does Mark Twain have a bobblehead? Does George Ade have a bobblehead? Does Mort Sahl have a bobblehead? Only the truly great should have bobbleheads. Like George Washington and Derek Jeter. And Jean Shepherd.

This magnificent bobblehead will stand as a focal point in my SHEP SHRINE. In the shrine he will star and he will glow, he will be in the spotlight.

HE WILL BOBBLE!

With his magnificent cleft in his chin (coincidentally, I have one also, but it’s hidden by my magnificent white beard). Most of us never knew about the super spandex undergarment hidden by the deceptively, unprepossessing, white shirt.

Bobbling, he represents the early Shep, where he smiles out at us from the front of his first comedy album, “Jean Shepherd and Other Foibles,” created way back in 1959.

foibles album

So I present to you the unique, plastic, 6.5″ high,

Jean Shepherd’s true,

self-exposed self:

Clark Kent–

Super-Shep-Bobbler,

J E A N   S H E P H E R D !

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A rarer,

more overwhelming sight,

I never expect to see.

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JEAN SHEPHERD–Shep Promotion Part 2 of 2

 

Here are ways that I have promoted my work regarding Shep:

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•Interviews: on Internet, radio, one on TV, and Paley Center appearance.

•Responded to reader comments on Internet sites referring to Shep.

•Authored several articles about Shep in print publications.

•Appearance and talk at Hammond’s ACS festival.

•Contributed paragraph about Shep for Hammond’s ACS brochure.

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•Discussion on two panels at the Old Time Radio Convention          

(Thanks again to Jackie Lannin for the Excelsior banner).

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•Two talks at public libraries.

shepquest

•References on my blog, www.shepquest.wordpress.com .

eb signing

•My occasional comments regarding some Customer Reviews

on  www.amazon.com and my “Author Page”on that site.

Syndicated.Kicks

•In all nine CD sets of Syndicated Shep,

my text about the audios and info about EYF!

(Shep book info layout by Radio Spirits).

play scenery

•My Shepherd play, “Excelsior,” (2 performances!)

EYF! pin

•My EYF! pin worn on very rare occasions.

(I designed it with my computer drawing program, printed it,

and took it to a pin-maker at the mall.

It’s 3.5″ diameter so ya can’t miss it!)

20160405_103117_resized

•The sweatshirt I designed and occasionally wear.

(Photo taken  in front of my Shep Shrine wall in my study.

Note Shep-poster, excelsior bottles,

Shep drawings on paper towel, etc.)

          •As always, I thank Jim Clavin for his constant promotion

of my work on his site, www.flicklives.com

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JEAN SHEPHERD–Shep Promotion Part 1 of 2

Jean Shepherd promoted his own books and other creative works in a variety of ways.

•He talked about them on his radio program

•He did book tours to bookstores

•He did radio interviews around the country to talk about the books and other work

•He mentioned them during live-appearances at schools and other stand-up venues.

He referred to two of his books of short stories as “novels” because novels, in general, sell better than books of short stories. (By the way, Norman Mailer–whom Shep disliked a lot for some probably causes I’ve commented on previously)–was probably the greatest ever self-promoter of his own persona and work.)

IGWT .novel. cover

Four opening titles of the movie A Christmas Story credit him. That his film and television stories use some of his short stories, by implication promotes his published stories. Lists of his stories used in ACS are familiar to many. Here, from www.flicklives.com, is part of its list of Shepherd short story subjects used in Shep’s 90-minute TV drama, “The Great American Fourth of July and Other Disasters”:

Wilbur Duckworth and the Magic Baton • The Blind Date • Scragging •

 The Wash Rag Pyramid Scheme • Uncle Carl’s Fireworks Stand •

 The Old Man’s Fireworks Display • Ludlow Kissel • Fireworks on the Roof of Roosevelt High

This above is not a negative description—all of this is good,

and standard operating procedure in our world.

In fact,  “Shep Promotion Part 2” describes ways in which I have promoted my work about Shep.

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JEAN SHEPHERD–Names for Kid Book?

A BOOK OF JEAN SHEPHERD KID STORIES

Will this book ever be published with ink on paper? Will it be an electronic artifact on this blog?  Of course, should one care to, one could create a word processing document and copy/paste into it each kid-story blog-post. Then one could have it and read it all together on a computer, or even on a tablet. One could print it all out and put it in a loose leaf binder. But. Official paper publication would be sooooooo nice!

Considering print publication in the near future, there should be an answer very soon. What to name the book and why?  The title should be: accurate; descriptive; catch the attention of Shep fans; capture the attention of non-Shep fans.

JEAN SHEPHERD’S KID STORIES

This seems obvious, but there might be the implication that it includes all–or at least many–of well-known stories already published. It doesn’t–not permitted by copyright owner.

KIDS: JEAN SHEPHERD STORIES

Seems good, but doesn’t have sufficient zing–falls flat somehow.

SHEP’S KID STORIES: I WAS THIS KID, SEE

This seems obvious, but there might be the implication that it includes all–or at least many–of well-known stories already published. It doesn’t. (See above.)

kid stories cover 1

Title I devised a while back

Photo credit: Steve Glazer and Bill Ek.

I WAS THIS KID, SEE: JEAN SHEPHERD KID STORIES

I like this best so far. This title, beginning with the phrase Shep so often used to begin one of his stories about kids, should be a no-brainer. Gives the familiar and intriguing Shep saying, gets Shep’s name and says what it contains. We’ll see what happens.

I wonder how many in-print copies it might sell.

In a year.

In forty years.

In as many years as Shep’s work remains recognized and enjoyed.

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JEAN SHEPHERD-Army stories funny or not? Part 1 of 2 & (9) ARTSY–Picasso

Is my book SHEP’S ARMY—BUMMERS, BLISTERS, AND BOONDOGGLES mostly funny or something else? Some people have commented that there are many negatively-focused stories. To me, despite some downers, they’ve seemed funny. I decided to do a self-survey of the stories and grade them myself, in order of their sequence in the book, giving each a very short description. Remember that no matter how negative a story is, Shep’s approach, in telling, usually has a feeling one might call witty or funny or humorous–maybe entertaining in a humorous way.

SHEP'S.ARMY.Cover_Final

PART 1: YOU’RE IN THE ARMY NOW

“Induction” Disappointment—he expects a patriotic ceremony NEGATIVELY FOCUSED

“Shorn”  Outrage at being shorn of his “ducktail”– ego  NEGATIVELY FOCUSED YET IRONICALLY FUNNY

“D is for Druid”  He fakes-out the authorities regarding his religion FUNNY

“Being Orientated”  Disparaging, with Broken Illusions NEGATIVELY FOCUSED

“Army Phraseology”  He encounters soldiers’ wild vocabulary FUNNY

PART 2 ARMY HOSPITALITY

“Shermy the Wormy” He and his fellows are very cruel NEGATIVELY FOCUSED

“GI Glasses”  He can’t see out of army glasses. Authorities are incompetent NEGATIVELY FOCUSED & FUNNY

“Lieutenant George L. Cherry Takes Charge” Disparaging authority NEGATIVELY FOCUSED & FUNNY

“Pole Climbing” Sad/frightening description of pole-climbing danger NEGATIVELY FOCUSED

“Service Club Virtuoso” A “folk” piano player NEGATIVELY FOCUSED & FUNNY

“Fourth of July in the Army”   He describes an army parade PATRIOTIFUNNY

“USO and a Family Invitation” He’s given a sexual treat  FUNNY

“Shipping Out” He leaves “Camp Swampy” for a tropical hell NEGATIVELY FOCUSED

PART 3 WARTIME IN FLORIDA IS HELL

“MOS: Radar Technician” He realizes that pole climbing is death-defying NEGATIVELY FOCUSED

“Radar at 15,000 Volts” Shep and fellow soldiers are afraid of radar equipment until someone plays a practical joke. FUNNY

“Swamp Radar” Military incompetence results in enormous loss of lives.  NEGATIVELY FOCUSED

“Night Maneuvers” Goofing off during night training DISPARAGING & FUNNY

“Lister Bag Attack” Soldier in need of anger management stabs water bag. SAD FUNNY

“Boredom Erupts” A fight over the meaning of “time” FUNNY

“Code School” Military incompetence results in code school students playing joke. DISPARAGING & FUNNY

“T/5” DESCRIPTIVE of his rank FUNNY

Stay tuned for part 2

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artsyfratsy 10010(9) Picasso
ARTSY introPicasso

I am a fanatical enthusiast of Picasso’s work (No, I don’t like it all, and, give me a particular example to defend, I may fail miserably).

After the first 8 of my ARTSY FARTSY  essays, I got my first comment about them. Joe Fodor, in the facebook group, “I am a fan of Jean Shepherd,” said he appreciated my invention of the Guernica Coloring Kit. This stimulated me to add additional comments regarding a  coupla Artsy encounters with  “Picasso.” (Everybody must have encountered Picasso in one manner or another, but a couple of my connections are surely rare.)

Years ago, attending an exhibit of ceramics in a Spanish museum (I think it was in Madrid or Barcelona), I encountered a small plate propped upright in a glass case with a caption indicating that the drawing on it was by Picasso, titled “Abstraction.” As he virtually never did anything totally “abstract,” I studied it a bit–and realized that it must have seemed abstract to whoever described and installed the piece, because it was mounted upside down.

Visualizing it the other way around, I saw that it was a sketchy image of a man on a horse (Don Quixote?). I wrote a short note to that effect and slid it between the front panes of glass, in front of the piece, and went on my way. I trust that some museum person would eventually see my note and correct the error.

Some years later, attending the large, 1980 Picasso retrospective at New York’s Museum of Modern Art, I encountered an etching of his with the wall label titled “image of the artist holding mask in center.” A quick glance told me that it was not a mask he held but a bellows camera. That night I wrote a note to the Museum and posted it regarding their error. The next time I visited the exhibit (I went five times), they’d corrected the wall label. (The catalog, published before the exhibition opened, retains the error.) I felt delighted that I had improved the content of this major Picasso exposition–if not the immemorial catalog.

ARTSY Picasso etching 20006

Illustration in my copy of the catalog

(Part of my Picasso collection.)

ARTSY icecream Picasso

A Baskin-Robbins

flavor of the month
ARTSY ARROWS0010

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