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Home » ARTSY FARTSY » JEAN SHEPHERD and Alexander King & (21) ARTSY-Full Color Newspaper Wars

JEAN SHEPHERD and Alexander King & (21) ARTSY-Full Color Newspaper Wars

In the late 1950s Jack Paar’s late-night TV program was the first big Tonight Show to gain wide popular viewership. (Remember that this was the show, earlier staring Steve Allen, that Shepherd was reportedly brought to NYC to take over—but the evidence shows that this was not so). Alexander King, as a guest, became very popular on Paar’s show. This resulted in high sales of several of his books.

A. King paar4

PAAR                          KING

King told autobiographical stories with entertaining wit and charm. The first paragraph of an Amazon Customer Review of a King book by Jon Richfield—-describes him well–at least as he appeared on TV: “King was a mercurial spoiled brat with enormous talent, great compassion, great selfishness, idiosyncratic tolerance and intolerance, impressive culture, totally variegated experience, a marvelous capacity for talking about it, and enormous charm. He raises serious doubts about some of what he says, but says it all with such natural conviction….”*

The New York Times obit of 11/17/1966 described his Paar appearances as providing “…witty, pungent, irreverent and continual outflow of comments on life, art, woman, sex, psychiatry, celebrities, narcotics addiction, and just about any other topic that happened to annoy him at the moment.”

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FIRST BIG KING BOOK

King’s charm, wit, and quirky energy captivated the audience. Shepherd’s style, being more of a slowly articulated description that relies on a build-up of humorous situation, did not grasp and hold a studio (or a home-viewing) audience sufficiently, I believe, which is why Shepherd-telling-a-story on television by simply talking, as he did on his radio shows, did not work. Fellow-performers on TV such as Ernie Kovacs and Victor Borge seemed to recognize this and undercut Shep—on live TV.

*King once claimed that he’d published his translations of Ovid’s love poems (43 BC-17 AD), even though he knew no Latin. He said that he gathered various translations of the poems and reworded them for the better. He said that he received acclaim for the best-ever translations of Ovid. Amusing story and very possibly true–but I’m not convinced. In fact, it may also be that, just as with Shep, little that King told was more than a smidgeon true to fact.

A.King Ovid book

The Love Books of Ovid:

A Completely Unexpurgated

and Newly Translated Edition.

Internet search shows several booksellers

offering this 1930, privately published book.

All booksellers (and the book’s spine) show

King only as illustrator.

true-false-sign

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(21) FULL COLOR NEWSPAPER WARS

The New York Times, from time to time, has published some esthetically lovely photographs. Beautifully composed, wonderfully colored. One might say, “masterpieces.” They compare with some of the great painted masterpieces of violent centuries past. Many of these depict the ravages of wartime. They’ve made me stop and wonder at my own intellectual/emotional conflict. I’ve saved scores of these images and concocted a couple into an elegant, cedar, cigar-box-artifact meant to preserve and remind. (It needs to be noted that some of the lovely photos I’ve saved from the Times are simply beautiful and not disagreeable in content.)

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Village: burns.

Man and grandmother: homeless refugees.

Women: grieve over the yellow head, cheerful red and white-striped cover

with body beneath.

burning landscape

wheelbarrow0003

women grieving

A few others in my collection.
black poles boat0003

photo recent0003

national guard0013

photo black pot

There are still elegant photos in the Times, and I look forward to those to come.

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ARTSY ARROWS0010

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