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Home » Comments about Shep » JEAN SHEPHERD—TRAVEL BOOK March on D.C. (1)

JEAN SHEPHERD—TRAVEL BOOK March on D.C. (1)

d.c. march button

Sorry for the delay in posting–we’ve now moved and are surrounded by scores of packed boxes we’re having trouble locating stuff in. The local library has come to our temporary rescue with internet access.  eb

MARCH ON WASHINGTON

August 28, 1963 was the day of the historic March on Washington, in which over two-hundred-and-fifty-thousand people gathered in and around the D. C. Mall, focused on the Lincoln Memorial, to demonstrate for civil rights and economic betterment.  Among those who performed on stage were Marian Anderson, Joan Baez, Bob Dylan and Mahalia Jackson.  Many other well-known people were also present.  The best-known part of the day is that often referred to as Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I have a dream” speech, which concluded with “…we will be able to speed up that day when all of God’s children, black men and white men, Jews and Gentiles, Protestants and Catholics, will be able to join hands and sing in the words of the old Negro spiritual, ‘Free at last, free at last. Thank God Almighty, we are free at last.’”

Rev-Martin-Luther-King-delivers-his-famous-I-Have-A-Dream-speech

Martin Luther King Jr. “I have a dream….”

The event was extensively covered by the press and television.  Jean Shepherd, consistent with his usual disposition, immersed himself in the activity not as a reporter, but as a participant—who could really experience it.  The result of his manner of participating is captured in his broadcast the evening after.  It is not like other descriptions of the event.  Although Shepherd always tells his improvised tales enthusiastically, immersing himself as well as listeners and readers, one might note a certain out-of-breath quality as he describes facts and little incidents while very much caught up in his reliving of the moment. In mid-thought he frequently remembers some tangential idea which must be inserted right then, and he tends to repeat himself a bit—an emotional reaction, I believe.  Some editorial adjustment brings these together as he would have meant them to be.  He sometimes gets especially excited when describing true events such as this March in which he participated.  NPR, during its fortieth anniversary celebration of the March, played a ten-minute segment of his broadcast.  This is Jean Shepherd’s unique historical document about what over two-hundred thousand participants experienced, and as such, it contains much objective truth.  As for Shepherd, he was overwhelmed.

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I was one of the marchers in the big demonstration yesterday, and this experience was probably one of the two or three—words such as “interesting” don’t really mean much in this case. And to use the word “significant” doesn’t mean much either, because “significant” of what?  Let’s just say it was one of the two or three most difficult to assay/weigh/put-into-perspective days that I have ever experienced in my life.  One of the two or three days.  The closest day that I can think of in my experience was VE Day, or maybe even VJ Day.  To the tenor, the tone, the quality of what went on and the way the people were.

I went down on this thing very specifically as just a marcher.  Just one of the people in a delegation, because I have learned through long experience—and hard experience—that the only real way that you ever get to have even a vague understanding about events is, if you can, possibly, be part of or in the group, or be in with people to whom the event is occurring.

I wonder just how much a newsman ever learns about anything—standing up on the platform.  I’m curious.  I listened to a lot of jazz yesterday from the newsmen and almost all of them were up on the platform, they were in the news section, which was very, very, very much roped off from the great herd of people who walked along the streets.  The great multitude who gathered under the trees, who pushed up through past the Coke stands and finally stood in front of the Lincoln Memorial.  I didn’t see many newsmen in that crowd.  In fact, I don’t recall seeing one newsman in that crowd.

Another thing that I found very interesting was going down on the bus—we left 47th Street and I rode on a bus with maybe two-hundred-thousand other people, all riding on busses toward Washington.  We had a very old, terrible bus.  I’ll tell you, have you ever ridden on a bus—a New York cross-town bus—all the way to Washington?  I’m serious—a lot of people did.  They just took the cross-town sign out and everybody sat on those plastic seats and went all the way to Washington and back.

Stay tuned for Part (2)

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